Collection Order
<< < > >>

Sacred Heart Church and School

Wabash Valley profiles : a series of tributes to hometown people and events that have shaped our history

Description: One typed page including photograph; brief history of the Sacred Heart Church and School.
ABASH VALLEY WP R O F I L E SA series of tributes to hometown people and events that have shaped our history.Sacred Heart Church and SchoolDedicated in 1924, Sacred Heart Church materialized from the growth of Saint Ann Church under the dynamic leadership of Father John Ryves. A new parish on the city's far north side may have been inevitable after St. John's Church in North Terre Haute, then called Ellsworth, was closed in 1914. By 1920 the congregation at Saint Ann's -- where Ryves was pastor and Father Aloysius B. Duffy was assistant pastor -- was Terre Haute's largest Catholic parish with more than 1,800 members. In 1919 a lot was purchased in the 2800 block of N. 13th Street. On Dec. 7, 1921, the parish acquired the residence of Dr. Odus Baldridge located on a more desirable site in a triangle between 13th St., Lafayette Ave. and Barbour Ave. Duffy, founder and first pastor at Sacred Heart, conducted services in the former Baldridge home, which was converted into a rectory and another building on the property was made a convent. Ground was broken for the new church-school were conducted in April 1923. Johnson, Miller & Miller were the architects and Roehm Brothers was the general contractor. The $89,000 structure with six school rooms on the second floor boasted red pressed brick and limestone trim. The sanctuary seated 500. The first mass was celebrated in the basement before the building was finished in March 1924. Its bell came from the old firehouse at Sycamore and Lafayette, where it was installed in 1860. The school opened in February with 186 pupils. When the church was dedicated on July 13, 1924, Holy Rosary Church of Seelyville -- founded in 1908 -- was attached as its mission. Father Duffy was transferred to Brownsburg in 1926 and was replaced by the Rev. Timothy Kavanaugh, who remained only a year. His replacements, Father Omer Eisenman and assistant pastor Father John Holloran, were compelled to steer the parish through the difficult Depression years. In July 1934, Father Jerome Pfau assumed that responsibility, establishing the Court of the Catholic Order of Foresters at Sacred Heart before being transferred to Saint Theresa's of Indianapolis in June 1939. Pfau's successors -- Fathers James Moore (193940) and James McBarron -- took advantage of the improving economy to refinance parish debt and embark on substantial renovation and remodeling programs. Beginning in 1950, the parish enjoyed significant growth and a new church and convent were planned to allow the existing building to be used exclusively as a school. The convent was dedicated on Aug. 15, 1953. Ground-breaking ceremonies for the new church were held May 8, 1955. The church was dedicated June 24, 1956. Both the church -- which now serves 450 families -- and the school, now offering pre-school to eighth grade for 165 pupils, have blossomed in recent years. Both have been further renovated and the convent has been converted into classrooms. The Holy Family Center was added to the church in 1995 under the guidance of Father Anthony Volz. Sister David Ellen Van Dyke, S.P., is serving her third term as principal, replacing Nancy Nation. Father Steve Giannini succeeded Father Volz as the pastor three years ago.TERRE HAUTE(812) 238-6000NATIONAL BANKAlways Close to HomeDate published: May 3, 2001Filename: Sacred Heart Church profile
Origin: 2001-05-08
Created By: McCormick, Mike
Publisher: Terre Haute Tribune-Star
Source: http://indianamemory.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/vchs/id/579
Collection: Vigo County Historical Society
Rights: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/UND/1.0/
Copyright: Copyright Undetermined
Subjects: Schools
Churches
Catholic churches
Religion
Religious facilities
Religious education
Education
Religion

Further information on this record can be found at its source.